Carl Zeiss in London at the Holiday Inn

The historic company from Jena in the former DDR came to town with a suite of state of the art microscopes on show. It was great to get not only an overview, but also first hand insights into the techniques of building microscopes. And thus I have been thinking about how to express my generic software methods such that they look useful to them.

As a first step, I visited their Imaging Applications and picked a few images to re-visualize – for more metric detail and new visual perspectives as usual – for experts to interpret. Ultimately, of course, their familiarity with their subject matter should be embedded into an expert system. The feedback with our software will then result in less skilled people able to use the system.

So far, I am doing my ‘number acrobatics’ by-hand, feeding the prototype software that I never intended to use for image handling. That’s the difference between large funded institutions and corporations and an inventor’s software-aided mind!

Here‘s an original image that I re-visualized:

An image collected with a ZEISS LSM 510 Meta

An image collected with a ZEISS LSM 510 Meta

And here’s my re-visualization as proof of the principle that my software methods represent the building blocks for a new tool of investigation – adding value to the physics and engineering of Zeiss’ microscopes.

The re-visualization is only for the human eye

The re-visualization for the human eye

“Software vision” can lead to automating image analysis by selecting and ranking images based on our quantifications.

I submitted the above example also to their Application Library.

Here‘s another original which I had to turn to match my re-visualization.

Adult Olfactory Bulb Granule Cell Integration

Adult Olfactory Bulb Granule Cell Integration

Value is added by more metric details for quantitative comparisons

Value is added by more metric details for quantitative comparisons

However, some of the ‘branches’ can’t be seen because they are below the surface that has been created by the blue blackground.

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About Sabine Kurjo McNeill

I'm a mathematician and system analyst formerly at CERN in Geneva and became an event organiser, software designer, independent web publisher and online promoter of Open Justice. My most significant scientific contribution is www.smartknowledge.space
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One Response to Carl Zeiss in London at the Holiday Inn

  1. Great post. I completely agree.

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